The Competitive Advantage of Industrial Districts: by Carlo Pietrobelli (auth.), Prof. Michele Bagella, Dr.

By Carlo Pietrobelli (auth.), Prof. Michele Bagella, Dr. Leonardo Becchetti (eds.)

Several fascinating effects at the economics of commercial districts are amassed during this booklet. the 1st half investigates over inner determinants of business district competitiveness taking a look at inner productiveness, at styles of innovation and at these elements which create a good business surroundings. the second one a part of the e-book investigates over international competitiveness of business districts concentrating on the functionality of export and of alternative kinds of internationalisation.

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463 fIITIls at 1992 according to Cerved database). The sample is stratified and randomly selected (it reflects sector, geographical and dimensional distribution of Italian firms) for firms from 11 to 500 employees. It is by census for firms with more than 500 employees. For a subsample of 3852 firms both qualitative and quantitative data (balance sheets for the period 1989-1991) are available. Qualitative data provide, among other things, information on firm property, degree of intemationalisation, entitlement to state subsidies and conclusion of agreements with partners and competitors.

For a subsample of 3852 firms both qualitative and quantitative data (balance sheets for the period 1989-1991) are available. Qualitative data provide, among other things, information on firm property, degree of intemationalisation, entitlement to state subsidies and conclusion of agreements with partners and competitors. 32 M. Bagella and 1. Becchetti relative specialisation in Traditional sectors and a despecialisation in High-Tech sectors; ii) a relevant weight of very small firms (with no more than 50 employees) in a system where small-medium firms represent the large majority; iii) the striking difference between firms in the North and firms in the South which are on average smaller, younger and have lower export capacity (Tab.

Thus, geographical agglomeration may increase the relative advantage of imitation on independent R&D effort, thereby reducing firm's private R&D expenditures. This paper provides a theoretical rationale for this hypothesis and tests theoretical predictions at microlevel on a sample of around 4000 firms for which information on locational choice and R&D expenditures is available. The theoretical section shows, in a simple two players' game, that, with no geographical proximity, the only feasible Weak Renegotiation Proof equilibrium is one where both firms always invest in R&D, while, with geographical proximity, this equilibrium is not in the set of strictly individually rational payoffs.

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